Genomic Track

26th November – 10:45- 12:00 – Session I
Education Track

Genomics – Time to Deliver

Until recently, direct clinical use of genetic sequencing has been limited to the diagnosis of inherited disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, caused by a change in a single gene. However, this genomics ‘revolution’ has positioned it at the heart of other areas, such as cancer.

Genomics is also being used clinically to diagnose and guide treatment of infectious disorders and our individual response to medicines, pharmacogenomics.

Genome sequencing is also important for understanding disorders, such as diabetes, that are due to a complex interplay of genetic factors along with diet, lifestyle and environmental factors. Such disorders constitute the majority of health problems.

Research has already led to the development of improved diagnostics and more effective management strategies, and future treatment will be tailored to a patient’s unique genomic makeup.

Chair

Mark Lawler

Mark Lawler

Chair in Translational Cancer Genomics, CCRCB Queen’s University Belfast, UK and Associate Director, Health Data Research UK

Panel

Andres Metspalu

Andres Metspalu

Estonian Genome Center/University of Tartu, Estonia

The 100,000 Genomes Project: precision healthcare in action

Mark Caufield

Mark Caulfield

William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, UK

Gianpiero Cavalleri

Gianpiero Cavalleri

RCSI Molecular & Cellular Therapeutics (MCT) Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

Peter Riegman

Peter Riegman

Head Tissue Bank, Erasmus MC